Mumble, mumble, murder - Page 2

A photographer shoots fake crime scenes in Joe Swanberg's meta-thriller '24 Exposures'

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Simon Barrett (center) investigates a murder in 24 Exposures.
PHOTO BY JOE SWANBERG

Clearly, 24 Exposures is poking fun at the erotic-thriller genre, and itself by extension. Any haters who cry "misogyny!" — because Swanberg's camera ogles just as much as Billy's does — are answered in a scene that's been planned with them in mind. Photographing death is "way more interesting than taking a picture of a fuckin' tree in your front yard," Billy tells Michael, who counters by asking, "Why is it always dead women? Why not a dead old guy?" It's not about that, Billy insists. "It's ridiculous for me to try and explain this, because it's not something that I even think about. You can't say, 'Why am I doing this?' You just have to say, 'OK, I'm attracted to this, and that's what I'm gonna do.'"

That's vague, and — again — Billy is a sleaze, but Swanberg's careful to make his underlying point visually. When Michael asks Billy, "Have you ever seen a real dead body?", it foreshadows the film's second cute-girl murder. A distinction is made when a character we've come to sympathize with is brutally killed, and hers is the only crime scene that doesn't invite us to leer at the victim.

The film's last act cuts some months ahead; we see aspiring memoirist Michael receiving feedback from a book agent (played by Swanberg), who advises him to rewrite his manuscript. There are too many loose ends, he says, and not enough strong connections between the cop and the photographer. Oh, and the ending needs work, too. 24 Exposures, you're talking to yourself — and you know it, and we know it, and you know we know you know.

Up next for the prolific, probably sleep-deprived Swanberg, who's likely also got a dozen or so new movies in the pipeline: helming an episode of the San Francisco-set HBO series Looking. Wonder if there'll be a scene set at the Roxie? *

 

24 EXPOSURES opens Fri/31 at the Roxie.

 

META WORLD PIECES: CATCHING UP WITH 24 EXPOSURES DIRECTOR JOE SWANBERG

 

SF Bay Guardian How's Sundance?

Joe Swanberg It's been amazing. [Happy Christmas] is a pretty small, personal movie, so it's nice that people seem to be liking it.

 

SFBG When will it be coming out theatrically?

JS We're probably gonna follow the Drinking Buddies (2013) release pattern of doing VOD and theatrical sometime around July, and then having it come out on DVD around Thanksgiving.

 

SFBG You've had 15 movies screen at the Roxie Theater in the past year, which is a pretty astonishing number.

JS They did a retrospective, which was incredible. Not only was it a great chance to hang out in San Francisco for a week, but it was amazing for me to look back at a lot of movies that I hadn't seen in a long time. It's also crazy to think that there's that much stuff. I sort of forget that I've made that many movies.

 

SFBG Do you not consider yourself prolific?

JS Because I don't write, I can very quickly jump from one project right into the next. The first six years I was making movies, I was making around one a year, because I had a day job and that was all the time I could spend on it. As soon as I was able to support myself as a filmmaker, I really was making a lot of them [laughs] — there was one year where I made six, which was really too many by anyone's standards. It made the following year really strange, trying to actually get all of those out into the world. And also, while they've all had some form of distribution, there's really only four or five of my movies that people have heard of. There's all of these others that only the hardcore cinephiles have checked out.

 

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