England made him - Page 2

A Michael York tribute highlights this year's Mostly British Film Festival

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Michael York hand-picked "England Made Me" (1973) for his in-person tribute.

After his Seventies peak, York remained busy. But his type began working against him — an ingenue's worst enemy (even a male one's) is the onslaught of age — and he didn't transition as well as some peers to character roles. He slid down the ranks via such odd stints as a short run on Dynasty knockoff Knots Landing and playing Dario Argento's Phantom of Death in 1988 (the director saving the word "opera" for a later movie). Eventually he was seldom used save to personify old-school Englishness as a joke or fossil, whether visibly (as Basil Exposition in the Austin Powers series) or as a voice actor (as a Transformer, in Star Wars and Batman cartoons, video games, audio books, etc.) In recent years he's also written several well-received memoirs and lectured extensively on acting Shakespeare.

England Made Me is not the only older film in Mostly British this year, though it's the only one that comes with a living star in person. No one will be resuscitating the recently decreased Peter O'Toole, memorialized with a screening of 1982's My Favorite Year; nor will there be any thawing for Richard Burton as The Spy Who Came in From the Cold, 1965's faithfully bleak adaptation of John le Carré's breakthrough novel. The latter film plays a "British noir night" with Stephen Frears' bizarre and rather brilliant 1984 The Hit.

Otherwise the focus, as usual, is on new (or new-ish) films from the UK and beyond. Some have already played theatrically here, like Neil Jordan's middling vampire opus Byzantium (2012), Beatles-related documentary Good Ol' Freda (2013), and Michael Winterbottom's biopic about the UK's sultan of 1960s and '70s smut, The Look of Love (2013).

Coming soon to theaters — sooner still if you catch them as part of the festival — are director Roger Michell and writer Hanif Kureishi's excellent seriocomedy Le Week-End, as well as Mumbai-set The Lunchbox. Speaking of the colonies, outback thriller Mystery Road and kidnapping drama Last Dance represent Australia.

If you appreciated Will Forte's turn in Nebraska (2013), it's worth seeing Run & Jump, in which he's equally effective as an American doctor whose emotions unfreeze while doing research in Ireland — also the setting for Stay, a drearier piece distinguished by Aidan Quinn's fine take on the stereotypical Irish rascally charmer. What Richard Did is a quietly intriguing melodrama about middle-class teenagers shaken by the aftermath of a fight outside a house party. Farther down the socioeconomic scale, Clio Barnard's The Selfish Giant offers a portrait of children involved in petty crimes that's as potent as the best of Ken Loach or the Dardennes. *

MOSTLY BRITISH FILM FESTIVAL

Feb. 13-20

Vogue Theatre

3290 Sacramento, SF

www.mostlybritish.org

 

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