Guardian Editorial

Burners and residents matter

|
()

EDITORIAL Burning Man and San Francisco have developed a close and symbiotic relationship in recent years, with members of the Board of Supervisors doing whirlwind VIP tours of the playa, burner artworks temporarily placed on city land, and event-sponsoring Black Rock City LLC supporting the Mayor's Office campaign to transform the Tenderloin into a nascent arts and technology district.Read more »

Airbnb must work with SF

|
()

EDITORIAL

Airbnb and other companies that facilitate illegal short-term apartment rentals to tourists visiting San Francisco need to engage in a more honest and direct dialogue with this city's political leaders and stakeholders, something that became clear during last week's Planning Commission hearing on legislation that would legalize and regulate short-term sublets.Read more »

Arguments against minimum wage increase are out of touch

|
()

EDITORIAL

"Will the SF minimum wage hike kill our restaurants?" Zagat SF tweeted last week.

No, Chicken Little, it won't. Not even if you tweet it.

Two days earlier, the Board of Supervisors had unanimously approved a measure for the November ballot to raise the city's minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2018, up from where it stands at $10.74.Read more »

Housing ballot measures would weaken city policy

With market-rate housing construction booming, Kim abandons effort to balance it with more affordability 

|
()

EDITORIAL Under the misleading guise of encouraging the development of more affordable housing in San Francisco, Mayor Ed Lee and Sup. Jane Kim have sponsored a pair of fall ballot measures that actually weaken existing housing policy in San Francisco. It's a ruse that shouldn't fool politically savvy San Franciscans.Read more »

Appealing to San Francisco values

|
()

EDITORIAL When lawyers become politicians, and when those politicians assume offices where they can exercise discretion about when to appeal judicial rulings, the decision to do nothing can be as big and impactful as the decision to file a lawsuit.Read more »

Beyond the bros

|
()

EDITORIAL

San Francisco's rapid economic growth is increasingly being framed in reference to the Tale of Two Cities, and signs of its staggering wealth gap are ubiquitous. Luxury retailers are gravitating to the South Bay to cater to the tastes of newly minted millionaires, the San Francisco Chronicle recently reported, while low-wage workers on opposite sides of the Bay are charging forward with campaigns to increase the minimum wage, since soaring rents and a rising cost of living have made it tricky to achieve basic economic survival.Read more »

Stop Big Tech sprawl

|
()

EDITORIAL The footprint of Big Tech companies and their employees continues to spread through San Francisco, gobbling up the vast majority of commercial office space this year, driving up rents, and creating pressure to build ever more office towers. With Wall Street and Silicon Valley investors focusing so much wealth on this one economic sector, in this one once-dynamic city, this trend is threatening to squeeze out every other civic interest and sector in its path.Read more »

Don't weaken protections against chain stores

|
()

EDITORIAL As we reported two weeks ago ("Breaking the chains," June 17), the San Francisco Planning Commission will soon consider rival measures to modify the city's decade-old policies regulating chain stores (aka formula retail businesses) and giving neighborhoods the ability to reject them. This should be viewed as a chance to strengthen protections, not to weaken them at a time when small businesses need all the help they can get.Read more »

End corporate welfare

|
()

EDITORIAL Big, powerful corporations seem to always find a way to get what they want out of City Hall, particularly under the administration of Mayor Ed Lee, and often at the expense of people who really do need the help.

For example, why is a city that projects annual budget deficits getting steadily bigger over the next five years spending almost $17 million annually on corporate welfare programs, including giving millions of dollars in tax breaks and other city perks to Twitter, a company worth $24 billion?Read more »

Justice delayed is justice denied

|
()

EDITORIAL Members of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors who try to identify with both the progressive movement and business-oriented Mayor Ed Lee — most notably, Sups. David Chiu and Jane Kim — engaged in a strange bit of self-congratulations during their June 10 meeting, patting themselves on the back for a trio of "progressive" reforms.Read more »